The People’s Right Of Revolution

The great American experiment … Can a free people govern themselves …..

History, for good or ill, is made by determined minorities.

During the American Revolution, the colonialists forces in the field against the King’s tyranny never amounted to more than 3% of the colonists. They were in turn actively supported by perhaps 10% of the population. In addition to these revolutionaries were perhaps another 20% who favored their cause but did little or nothing to support it. Another one-third of the colonial population sided with the King, and the final third took no side, and took what came.

The Declaration justified the independence of the United States by listing colonial grievances against King George III, and by asserting certain natural rights, including a right of revolution. Having served its original purpose in announcing independence, the text of the Declaration was initially ignored after the American Revolution. Its stature grew over the years, particularly the second sentence, a sweeping statement of individual human rights:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

This sentence has been called “one of the best-known sentences in the English language” and “the most potent and consequential words in American history”.

The Declaration of Independence says in the clause that is often referred to as “The People’s Right of Revolution”:

That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

James Madison has some words for future generations, often contained in the Federalist Papers, written under the synonym “Publius”. During the campaign for Constitutional ratification a series of newspaper articles now known as the Federalist Papers were published under the name “Publius”, Madison wrote about a third of them. Alexander Hamilton was the primary author, John Jay wrote a few.

Based on his efforts, Madison has been referred to as the “Father of the Constitution”, but at the time he asserted it was “a credit to which I have no claim”.

James Madison quotes:

Crisis is the rallying cry of the tyrant.

A popular Government without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy, or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.

A people armed and free forms a barrier against the enterprises of ambition and is a bulwark for the nation against foreign invasion and domestic oppression.

Americans need never fear their government because of the advantage of  being armed, which the Americans possess over the people of almost every other nation.

Besides the advantage of being armed, which the Americans possess over the people of almost every other nation, the existence of subordinate governments, to which the people are attached, and by which the militia officers are appointed, forms a barrier against the enterprises of ambition, more insurmountable than any which a simple government of any form can admit of. Notwithstanding the military establishments in the several kingdoms of Europe, which are carried as far as the public resources will bear, the governments are afraid to trust the people with arms.

Conscience is the most sacred of all property; other property depending in part on positive law, the exercise of that being a natural and unalienable right. To guard a man’s house as his castle, to pay public and enforce private debts with the most exact faith, can give no title to invade a man’s conscience, which is more sacred than his castle, or to withhold from it that debt of protection for which the public faith is pledged by the very nature and original conditions of the social pact.

Hence it is that such democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths. Theoretic politicians, who have patronized this species of government, have erroneously supposed that by reducing mankind to a perfect equality in their political rights, they would, at the same time, be perfectly equalized and assimilated in their possessions, their opinions, and their passions.

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2 thoughts on “The People’s Right Of Revolution

  1. Pingback: Obama’s Acting Solicitor General: If The Public Doesn’t Like The Individual Mandate, The They Can Just Choose To Earn Less Money, In Other Words Get Poor « Tarpon's Swamp

  2. Pingback: Democrats Doubt Barack Obama’s Reelection Chances « Tarpon's Swamp

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